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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 124

Midterm assessment of the every newborn action plan: A lot needs to be done


1 Department of Community Medicine, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Medical Research Unit, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication4-Oct-2018

Correspondence Address:
Prateek Saurabh Shrivastava
3rd Floor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai Village, Thiruporur-Guduvanchery Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/LJMS.LJMS_33_18

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Midterm assessment of the every newborn action plan: A lot needs to be done. Libyan J Med Sci 2018;2:124

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Midterm assessment of the every newborn action plan: A lot needs to be done. Libyan J Med Sci [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 13];2:124. Available from: http://www.ljmsonline.com/text.asp?2018/2/3/124/242730



Maintenance of optimal newborn health plays a crucial role in the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals.[1] The available estimates pertaining to the newborn deaths clearly indicate the importance of the first few hours, days and weeks in the lives of humans, as evidenced by the deaths of 1 million and 2.6 million children on their first day and first 4 weeks of their lives, respectively.[1] Further, it has been estimated that close to 50% of all the reported deaths among children within the age-group of 0-5 years, actually happen within the first 4 weeks.[2]

In addition, to understand the graveness of the problem, it has been found that almost 75% of all newborn deaths occur due to three preventable and manageable conditions, namely prematurity complications, incidents during childbirth, and neonatal infections.[2] Acknowledging the fact that almost all stillbirths and newborn deaths are preventable, there is an immense need to ensure the provision of quality assured care during childbirth, especially in low-resource settings.[1],[2],[3] It is vital to understand that the 1st month of life is the foundation stone for a better long-term health and development and a healthier and prosperous community.[2] Moreover, efforts have been taken to improve the quality of care worldwide, which is a critical element to facilitate newborn and child survival.[1] This has been done through the training of the health staff, supply of medical equipment and medications, and strengthening of the existing infrastructure.[1] It is not a hidden secret that settings with poor quality of care, the demand for the same decreases and hence pregnant women prefers to get delivered at home instead of the health facilities.[2] In fact, some of the nations have together started a network in 2017 to improve the quality, maintain equity and dignity in health care, and to promote the exchange of good practices between different nations.[1],[2] This network predominantly targets women from vulnerable sections of the community and at the same time is building up evidence for other nations with high rates of newborn deaths.[2]

Maintenance of optimal newborn health plays a crucial role in the attainment of the sustainable development goals.[1] The available estimates pertaining to the newborn deaths clearly indicate the importance of the first few hours, days, and weeks in the lives of humans, as evidenced by the deaths of 1 million and 2.6 million children on their 1st day and first 4 weeks of their lives, respectively.[1] Further, it has been estimated that close to 50% of all the reported deaths among children within the age group of 0–5 years, actually happen within the first 4 weeks.[2] Realizing the magnitude of the problem and its impact on multiple dimensions, it was decided to implement measures at the national level to reduce the number of newborn deaths.[1],[2] Thus, the member states of the United Nations initiated the every newborn action plan (ENAP), which lays down the path to bring about an end to the avertable newborn deaths, by means of accomplishing a set of targets by 2020.[2] The midterm analysis of the plan across the high-burden nations indicates a positive movement of the nations toward the set targets, with implementation of national plans, conduction of training sessions for health-care workers, and intensification of efforts to have an improved understanding about the underlying reasons for the newborn deaths.[2] On the similar lines, actions have been taken to improve data collection, as without that the existing gaps cannot be identified, and thus required steps cannot be taken to bridge the gap.[1] Even though gains have been observed, still a lot needs to be done, and there is a great need for collaborative efforts between all the stakeholders, including the individual mother and their families.[1] In addition, there is a need that financial assistance should be given to the developing nations by the donor agencies to sustain the gains achieved and continue the good work.[1],[2]

There is an indispensable need to reduce the number of stillbirths and newborn deaths as almost all of them are preventable. The ENAP remains a good tool for the policymakers to move forward and accomplish the set targets.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Costello A, Peterson SS. Commitment and Action – For Every Newborn; 2017. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/commentaries/commitment-every-newborn/en/. [Last accessed on 2018 Jul 05].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
World Health Organization. Reaching the Every Newborn National 2020 Milestones: Country Progress, Plans and Moving Forward. Geneva: WHO Press; 2017. p. 1-13.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Fostering the practice of rooming-in in newborn care. J Health Sci 2013;3:177-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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