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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 56-61

Bacillus cereus as an emerging public health concern in Libya: Isolation and antibiogram from food of animal origin


1 Department of Food Hygiene and Control Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya
2 Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya
3 Department of Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
4 Department of Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt
5 Department of Genomics, The Lombardy and Emilia Romagna Experimental Zootechnic Institute (IZSLER), Brescia, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ibrahim M Eldaghayes
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P. O. Box 13662, Tripoli
Libya
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/LJMS.LJMS_5_18

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Background: This study was conducted to investigate the presence of Bacillus cereus in meat, meat products, and some seafood in Libya. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty-one samples were collected from different geographic localities in Libya. The samples were subjected to microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of B. cereus by conventional cultural, biochemical, and molecular identification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA techniques. Results: Of 131 samples, only 38 (29%) isolates were found to be B. cereus based on their cultural characteristics on Mannitol Egg-Yolk Polymyxin (MYP) medium that included 30% beef, 38.2% beef products (minced, burger, kabab, and sausage), 31.8% camel meat, and 48% chicken products (burger, sausage, kabab, and liver). However, B. cereus was not detected from mutton and seafood samples. Seventeen isolates were subjected to molecular identification using PCR and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA technique and confirmed to be B. cereus. The confirmed B. cereus strains were tested for their antibiotic sensitivity profiles and showed a high percentage of multiresistance phenotype. Conclusions: The results provide a better understanding of B. cereus isolated from food of animal origin in Libya and suggest that meat and meat products might play an important role in the spreading of B. cereus through the food chain with antimicrobial resistance characteristics.


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